Keynote Presentation Abstracts

Amanda Pagliarino, Coordinator, AICCM Environmental Guidelines Project, Head of Conservation and Registration, Queensland Gallery of Modern Art AT THE INTERSECTION – Sustainability, Climate Change and Collection Care

Dr Louise Floyd, Associate Professor of Law, James Cook University, and Barrister, Supreme Court of Queensland The Law and Museums – dusting off the cobwebs and discussing emerging legal issues that may affect the museum sector

Dr Ruth Kerr, OAM, Historian and Adjunct Professor in History, University of Queensland Mining Heritage: Queensland’s Diverse History

AT THE INTERSECTION – Sustainability, Climate Change and Collection Care

Amanda Pagliarino, Coordinator, AICCM Environmental Guidelines Project, Head of Conservation and Registration, Queensland Gallery of Modern Art

Over recent years Conservators and Collection Managers working in the Museum & Gallery sector have seen significant changes in the way in which cultural heritage collections are managed. New national collection care guidelines have been published – Environmental Guidelines for Australian Cultural Heritage Collections (Australian Institute for the Conservation of Cultural Material, 2019), and past guidelines have been revived – Guidelines for Environmental Control in Cultural Institutions (Heritage Collections Council, 2002). The recent adoption by the Council of Australian Art Museum Directors of the Bizot Green Protocol for loans (International Group of Organizers of Major Exhibitions, 2015) has precipitated a collaborative review of the way in which national and state galleries exchange cultural heritage objects, focusing on a more sustainable, open and pragmatic approach to access. Collection conservation and preservation activities are being examined through a ‘green’ lens and new protocols for the use of consumables and materials, and for waste disposal and recycling are being embedded in collection care practices.

In our work as museum and gallery practitioners we frequently hear the words sustainability, carbon footprint, energy efficiency, and green targets. In the context of our changing work practices and a changing climate we need to understand what impact these issues have on the sector and what actions we can take to adopt new ways of working that will make a positive change.

The Law and Museums – dusting off the cobwebs and discussing emerging legal issues that may affect the museum sector

Dr Louise Floyd, Associate Professor of Law, James Cook University, and Barrister, Supreme Court of Queensland

While their main mission is to preserve and showcase important aspects of our lives and history, museums engage workers and generally people recognise them as an important part of our society.  Consequently, there are a number of legal issues which are relevant to them.  In this one hour presentation, Dr Louise Floyd canvasses some of the key emerging legal issues affecting museums, such as:

  • Volunteer workers and responsibilities of managers.
  • Legal problems arising from internet use – if a museum establishes a website, all sorts of opportunities may open up, but what can be said of freedom of expression and possible problems such as cyberbullying and defamation?

Covid 19 – what lessons have we learned from and what laws are relevant as a result of the restrictions invoked from that terrible disease?

Mining Heritage: Queensland’s Diverse History

Dr Ruth Kerr, OAM, Historian and Adjunct Professor in History, University of Queensland

In historical terms mining is considered a romantic and secretive industry. The industry has been a major contributor to the Australian economy since the discovery of coal at the mouth of the Hunter River in 1791 and gold at Bathurst in 1851. There is a rich mining heritage in Queensland. However few places of mining heritage significance are promoted and open to the public. Instead many mining machinery relics have been transported into regional historical museums and displayed. This presentation seeks to assess and explain why this is so.